Pošip

Pošip

Pošip , Pošip bijeli, Pošipak and Pošipica are all local names for this indigenous white grape variety from the island of Korčula. It can also be found on the islands of Lastovo and Mljet, but can be grown all over Dalmatia. Pošip thrives on sandy soils, protected from wind, and gives large clusters that produce a high-quality, delicious wine. The golden yellow wine is dry, offering a strong aroma of dried apricots and figs, and has 12–13% of alcohol. Pošip wines have a distinct fragrance and high acidity levels, and they make great wines for storing and ageing.

 

Legend has it that Pošip was a vine that grew wild, found by chance, and scientific research has found that it was probably created as a spontaneous cross between two varieties from Korčula, Bratovina and Blatska zlatarica. It is believed that its name comes from the elongated and pointy shape of the berries, which reminded the people of Korčula of the sharp end of a farming tool known as šip. It is one of the oldest and most highly regarded white varieties, and is associated with Korčula because it has been cultivated there since ancient times. In 1967, the wine that came from the village of Čara on Korčula became the first white wine in Croatia to be awarded the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), and it still holds value today. In fact, the Pošip variety is steadily gaining importance in southern Croatia, spreading and being grown on land as well, in vineyards that are sprouting up across Dalmatia.

 

This variety can be used to make fresh wines that age in oak barrels, as well as semi-sweet wines for those with a sweet tooth. Pošip can be served with grilled whitefish, barbecued tiny blue fish or bottom-dwelling freshwater fish, clam stew, as well as lobster and European lobster in various delicious dishes.