Chardonnay

Chardonnay

The French white variety Chardonnay is predominantly grown in northwest and northeast Croatia, as well as Istria and the Croatian Littoral region. It produces refreshing wines with strong fruity aromas.

 

Chardonnay is a popular white grape variety that originated in France, most likely Burgundy, where there is still a village by the same name. Over time, it spread throughout the world, so in addition to the French regions of Alsace, Burgundy and Champagne, it is also grown in the US, Australia and Italy. Croatian winemakers grow this variety in northwest and northeast Croatia, Istria and the Croatian Littoral.

 

Chardonnay owes its popularity to a balanced yield and neutral flavour that enables winemakers to produce different styles of wines. The most important factors for growing Chardonnay are the climate, soil and position of the vineyard, as the grapes take in elements from its surroundings or the terroir they grow in. Although the variety is mainly used as a basis for producing refreshing wines with strong fruity aromas, Chardonnay is also suitable for making sparkling wines.

 

When it comes to food, young Chardonnay wine goes well with seafood dishes, soft cheeses, pasta and salads that contain a lot of herbs, as well as dishes with apples and pears. On the other hand, wines that have been left ageing in the barrel for a longer period of time pair well with fattier fish such as salmon or mackerel, chicken with creamy sauces, and crabs. Chardonnay can also be served as a dessert wine to go with fruit desserts. Still wines from the Chardonnay variety are best served at around 12°C.