Mosor

Mosor

A mighty jewel a stone’s throw away from Split

Just like all other mountains in the Dinaride range, Mosor stretches northwest-southeast, in parallel with the Adriatic coast, and thanks to its height, it offers spectacular views of open seas and islands. The tops of Mosor neither have vertical cliffs like many Alpine tops, nor do they excel in rich woods like inland mountains. However, they have everything a mountaineering fan needs to be thrilled immediately and then lured to venture into another climb on this mountain.

Poljica s Mosora
Alan Čaplar

Mosor is a high karst mountain dominating the area between Split and Omiš. It is separated from Kozjak by a deep ravine, Klis and it stretches southeast towards the river Cetina. The highest summit, Veliki Kabal, is 1339  meters high and the total length of the mountain is 25 kilometres. The backbone is an extremely rocky ridge, made of limestone, which slopes sharply on both sides. The northern slope features many limestone and karst pits and deep limestone depressions, especially around the peak of Jabukovac, while the southern slope displays terraced valleys. The western side of Mosor is made of the part of the ridge that stretches from Klis to the pass of Ljubljana and the highest peaks on this area are Debelo Brdo, Plišivac and Kunjevod. The central, highest and most visited part of Mosor is the area of the ridge where the peaks of Ljubljan and Veliki Kabal are. Eastern Mosor stretches all the way from the pass of Ljuto kame to the river Cetina and it accommodates the peaks of Botajna, Sveti Jure (Kozik) and Lišnica.

Mosor
Alan Čaplar

Mosor has long attracted mountaineers, Alpinists and speleologists. On clear days, Mosor offers impressive views from all its sides but gazing at the recognisable contours of the city of Split is the most beautiful view of all. Thanks to a rich network of blazed trails, various field trips are possible, from light half-day walks to challenging multiple-day tours. The main access roads to the peaks of Mosor begin in a settlement of Poljica, Sitno Gornje, to which there is a regularly operating bus service from Split. The mountain lodge Umberto Girometta can be reached in a less than one hour of climbing wherefrom a number of signposts indicate the direction to other interesting peaks and destinations.


On the northern side of the mountain, at Dugopolje, there is the most interesting karst phenomenon of Mosor’s broader area – Vranjača cave. It consists of two halls: the first was known as early as in the 19th century and has no speleothems while the other hall was discovered in 1903 by the owner of the property where Vrnjača is, Stipe Punda. This second hall thrills with the richness of speleothems of various forms and colours. The total length of cave channels is around 360 meters.

Mosor
Alan Čaplar

The karst structure and exposure to sun and heat during summer make mountaineering challenging and therefore ascents should be planned in the morning hours and long walks should be avoided, especially around noon and in the early afternoon hours. Water is scarce on the whole of Mosor due to its karstic features, except for some rare areas around isolated springs and water ponds and so plenty of water should be carried along. Still, a well-prepared visit to Mosor offers a unique experience of mountain and sea one should not miss.